Trail Running With Vibram FiveFingers

by Emily Wednesday, August 25th 2010

How I Learned to Not Hate Running


I started my first trail run ever with the goal that I would just run as much as I wanted to. A quarter of a mile in on the Marshall Gulch trail, I started thinking I should have set some loftier goals, seeing how I only seemed to want to run a few paces at a time up the small but steep rises and dips and rock-hopping creek crossings. From hiking this trail, I had always considered it a mellow walk on a soft shaded path, and now suddenly I was noticing there were rocks and hills everywhere, and they were hard to negotiate at the clumsy speed I seemed to be favoring. There's that spot a little ways in on the trail where if you cut into the creek you run into a small little bouldery waterfall and the sides of the water basin below it are covered in moss; it's always been a favorite spot of mine, as I'm sure it is for many people, and I decided to stop there, sit on a rock, and reset.

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My favorite rest stop along the trail.

I've never really liked running. Even when I was running fifteen plus miles a week, I liked the adrenaline and energetic exhaustion I felt afterwards, but never liked the feel of the activity itself. It's so repetitive, and if I didn't have headphones piping music into my ears, I'd get a song I didn't like stuck in my head (which was sometimes beneficial, because I'd get so furious at some whiny little melody that I would run faster, as if I could somehow get away from it). Running is just . . . uncomfortable. So I sat cross-legged on the rock next to the little waterfall in Marshall Gulch and just concentrated on feeling the balance of my back sitting up straight, listening to the water instead of my inane I-hate-running thoughts, and relaxed. Finally a bee urged me to keep moving by trying to crawl under my palm.

On Attempt Number Two I let my strides be shorter as I pranced up the little ridge, and instead of thinking about running I looked around at beautiful yellow columbines, and the stark tree trunks on the side of the hill that got burned. I looked up instead of at the trail in front of me, and realized that my feet in their Vibram Fivefingers could take care of themselves; I could feel and adjust to all the rocks instead of watching and avoiding them. Two women were resting on a tree trunk in front of me and graciously offered me sunscreen when I admitted I'd forgotten mine. One woman asked me about my shoes, and after I explained they were basically just a little piece of rubber to protect my feet, she said she thought they were neat but worried that her ankles would roll on her. "Well, you just don't go that fast," I said, which was something I'd just realized. If you stay at the pace your body likes and can respond to, then it does a pretty good job of protecting itself. It's pretty neat to feel so connected and receptive to the ground you're on.

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Women’s Vibram FiveFinger KSO

I made it to the saddle and started in on the Wilderness of Rocks trail. As I slowly minced my way down the slope, the thought popped in to my head that it would be fun to run up it on the way back. (Really? Fun? I thought I hated running . . .) I had some time to scramble around on the rocks and watch beautiful purple storm clouds roll in before thunder sounded and I remembered that a valley full of burned and fragile trees was not a place to be in a lightning storm. So I ran back, and running up that scree-covered hill was fun, and so was running down the switchbacks on the ridge back down to the creek, and there were no songs stuck in my head and no inane thoughts rattling around. My feet felt strong and my posture felt comfortable, and halfway back a smile accidentally crept its way onto my face. A rocky little gully came at me too fast, but my feet found just the right places to keep me from tripping and I let out a little whoop, so thankful that my body found a way through without my brain getting in the way. The way back seemed to be taking no time and barely any effort at all. Among darkening clouds and thunder that sounded like gunfire and the felling of trees, I found myself wishing the car was further and further away.

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Yellow Columbines along the trail.

Activities

Ice Lake

by Craig Wednesday, August 11th 2010

Ice Lake, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

Just getting to the trailhead for Ice Lake outside of Silverton, Colorado is a delight to the senses. The San Juan Mountains are quite a treat for a desert dweller in the summer, even what the locals were calling a heat wave felt refreshing and energizing. Just two miles north of Silverton on US 550 the left turn-off to South Mineral Campground led us along a well graded road to the campground and the trailhead. After a couple days of car camping and touring the San Juans by car we were ready to hike and get a closer view.

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Taking In the Incredible Vistas

The number of cars in the parking lot should have tipped me off that we had stumbled on to something special; but I just went through the motions preparing for an overnighter in what I thought was just the standard issue Southwestern Colorado glory. The hike in is short so we launched onto the trail with a relaxed, slow and easy pace. A good thing too, because it is uphill, not terribly steep but consistent. The trail stays near the creek most of the way, switchbacking through a forest of Spruce and Fir with a green and flowering carpet . As the trees started to thin out the flowers started to take over. It seemed that we couldn't escape a waterfall view. Next thing you know we reach Lower Ice Lake. We spy a prime campsite and spring into action.

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Beautiful Wildflowers Along the Trail

Lean-to erected, tent pitched: we high five as it starts to rain and we watch a few more parties stroll through and look for their own slice of paradise. An hour or so of rain does nothing to dampen our spirits as we lounge under the tarp. Once the storm breaks we head beyond tree-line and Ice Lake. Less than an hour later we reach Ice Lake. WOW! I have seen some pretty water but this is something special. The color was changing as the sun flirted with the clouds. We burned up the memory card as we gawked and repeatedly said things like, “That is so awesome!” Another storm with a menacing electrical component sent us scurrying back to the comfort of camp. There are a few more lakes up in Ice Lake Basin but they would have to wait for the next day.

Ice Lake
Ice Lake (back) and an Unnamed Lake (front)

The next morning we had a leisurely breakfast , policed camp, then headed back to Ice Lake Basin. Ice Lake was just as we remembered it, so we couldn’t help but dawdle before exploring the basin some more. Fuller Lake was the next stop. More gawking and dawdling. Past Fuller Lake there seems to be a reasonable line to a high ridge over 13,000ft that could offer some mellow ridge walking. Alas we wouldn’t find out. Cracking and booming in the sky and a steady darkening turned us around. We tried to wait it out near Ice Lake and attempt a trip to Island Lake nearby. Nope; discretion is the better part of valor. Right.

The storm never let up. We sat under the tarp for a couple of hours waiting for a lull. Finally we packed everything wet and headed for the car. The steady rain let up about 10 minutes before we reached the car. Perfect. The long ride home allowed us plenty of time to plot our next trip to Ice Lake and scheme how to be there while the flowers are blooming but avoid the thunderstorms. We shall return.

DIRECTIONS:

From Silverton drive 2 miles north on US 550. Look for the left hand turn-off for the Mineral Creek Area roughly 6 miles of good dirt road brings you to the South Mineral Campground and the Ice Lake Trailhead.

Trips

Mt Lemmon’s Meadow Trail Loop

by Dave Baker Monday, July 12th 2010

Short and sweet, this little hike is a pleasant 2.2 mile walk very near the top of Mt. Lemmon, the high point of the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. It’s a great place to stretch the legs and enjoy a quiet walk among the cool pines after a drive up the Catalina Highway, and you’ll still have plenty of time to visit Summerhaven and Ski Valley.

Mt Lemmon's Meadow Trail

Reach the trailhead (32.44036 N, 110.7858 W, WGS84) by following the Catalina Highway from the Tucson valley towards the small settlement of Summerhaven. Just short of Summerhaven, turn right (west) onto “Ski Run Rd”. Continue on Ski Run Road past the ski facility through a gate (often closed during winter months), and on up the narrow winding road to the trailhead parking lot near the top of Mt. Lemmon.

Aspen Fire deadfall

The Mt. Lemmon Trail #5 leaves the west side of the parking lot right next to a fenced electrical facility, crosses a dirt road and very soon reaches a signed junction with the “Meadow Tr. #5A”, which splits off to the right. The Meadow Trail first wanders near the observatory and old Air Force facility occupying the true summit of Mt Lemmon, and then heads into the woods down a broad and gentle ridge line. Before rejoining Mt Lemmon Trail #5, the trail passes through an area charred by the 2003 Aspen Fire, where burned trees have toppled across the path. At the junction with the Mt Lemmon Trail, turn left (east) to head back towards the parking lot. A few tenths of a mile later, the junction with the short trail out to Lemmon Rock Lookout is encountered.

Lemmon Rock Lookout

Lemmon Rock Lookout

Season: Spring, summer and fall. The trailhead is closed to vehicular access for much of the winter, and snow often obscures many sections of the hike.

Water: Bring your own.

Difficulty: Easy. The full loop including the side trip to Lemmon Rock Lookout is about 2.2 miles long and involves about 350’ of elevation gain. One section of trail has been damaged by fire and is littered with deadfall.

Notes: This is a Forest Service fee area.

Maps: Green Trails Maps Santa Catalina Mountains, or National Geographic Arizona digital map software.

Map

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Trails

Mt Wrightson’s Old Baldy Trail

by Dave Baker Friday, June 18th 2010

The hike up Mt Wrightson is one of the very finest outings in southern Arizona.

At 9,453 feet, Mt Wrightson is the high point of the Santa Rita Mountains and also the highest of all the peaks surrounding the Tucson valley. The mountain is named in honor of William Wrightson who was killed by Apaches in 1865 on the east side of the range not far from present day Sonoita and Patagonia.

Mt Wrightson summit celebration

Enjoying Wrightson’s summit

Far and away the most popular way to approach Mt Wrightson is via Madera Canyon, a major north facing drainage that supports a rich and relatively cool, moist environment. Madera is a southern Arizona treat, with its great beauty, diverse ecology and excellent hiking. Many trails leave Madera Canyon Road and the canyon is known worldwide for its fantastic bird watching.

Two trails to the top of Mt Wrightson originate in the same parking lot at the end of Madera Canyon Road: the Super Trail and the Old Baldy Trail. The trails crisscross half way up the mountain at Josephine Saddle and finally join together again a mile below the summit. The Old Baldy Trail is the shorter and steeper of the two, and probably the most popular, especially during the warmer months of the year since its route favors north facing slopes that offer more shade on hot days.

Mount Wrightson

Mt. Wrightson, or “Old Baldy”, south of Tucson

A trip to the top of Wrightson via The Old Baldy Trail is strenuous, climbing nearly four thousand feet on the 5.3 mile trip to the top. The trail is often used by area hikers preparing themselves for trips to the Grand Canyon and other destinations with big elevation gains.

Find the trailhead at the very end of the Madera Canyon Road (31.71232 N, 110.87404 W, WGS84). The Old Baldy Trail leaves the upper-most parking lot at its southwest end. Walk southwest from the parking lot up a jeep road for two or three hundred yards, watching for the Old Baldy Trail junction on the left side of the path.

Above Baldy Saddle

The trail doesn’t mess around and immediately begins climbing steadily, early on passing many Arizona madrone trees mixed among oak, juniper and Ponderosa pine. In two and half miles one arrives at Josephine Saddle, an excellent destination and turn-around spot for those looking for a more moderate, yet rewarding outing.

Above Josephine Saddle the trail continues uphill as it switchbacks across the steep northern slopes of Mt Wrightson before reaching Baldy Saddle (8,700’), a fine place to rest and catch your breath.

Summit switchbacks

Descending summit switchbacks

From the Saddle it’s another mile of climbing and switch-backing to the top, and the panoramic views for which Wrightson is so well known: Mexico, Baboquivari Peak, Tucson, the Catalinas and Rincon Mts, the Huachucas, Sonoita and Patagonia, are just a few of the landmarks to be seen.

Season: This hike is done year round, but seasonal weather conditions must be taken into consideration. Winter snow and dangerously slippery ice can impede or halt progress altogether at the high elevations, especially on the summit dome of Mt Wrightson. During summer months this hike is hot in the lower elevations, so early starts and an ample supply of water are recommended.

Water: There may be seasonal water at Bellows and Baldy Springs; but as always, bring plenty of your own and treat any water you might collect.

Difficulty: Strenuous. This hike is on the hard side with a 4,000 elevation gain and 10.5 mile round trip distance.

Note: This is a Forest Service fee area.

Maps: Green Trails Maps – Santa Rita Mountains.

Map

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Trails

The Authors

Dave BakerDave Baker

I'm Dave Baker, founder of Summit Hut, an independent outdoor retailer based in Tucson, Arizona since 1969. As an experienced and passionate hiker, climber and backpacker, my blog is intended to be an informative and interesting look into the outdoors and the outdoor industry.

Dana Davis

Dana Davis

I’m Dana Davis, co-owner of the Summit Hut. I mostly enjoy hiking and road biking though I often do other things to keep it interesting (mountaineering, motorcycling, backpacking, climbing, you name it!) My biggest challenge is sometimes finding the balance between career, family, and fun but it’s working out so far!

Dan Davis

Dan Davis

I'm Dan Davis, after retiring from the National Park Service as a Ranger and manager, I worked for the Summit Hut until 2009, then retired for good (maybe). I'm now spending my time traveling around the southwest writing and working on my nature and fine art photography business.

Emily Gindlesparger

Emily Gindlesparger

I’m Emily Gindlesparger, a member of the Summit Hut floor staff. Since moving here from the Midwest, I’ve been taking advantage of all possible adventures in Arizona: rock climbing, mountain biking, backpacking, whitewater kayaking, caving and trail running; I’m always excited to see what’s next!